Course Catalog

  • Second Grade Art

    • Symmetrical letters of names
    • Color, balance and composition
    • Linear patterns
    • Camouflaging name in a bug
    • Painted gourds
    • Aboriginal design
  • English 6

    The purpose of the 6th grade Language Arts program is to engage students in the acts of reading, writing, and communicating. They will learn to become active readers and further develop reading comprehension, apply critical and creative thinking skills, and cultivate independent habits of mind. Students will write in many genres, including poetry, short stories, essays, journals, and persuasive speeches, as well as create interactive presentations. Students will also learn to organize, revise, and critique written work, and plan and implement a research paper and project


    The novels on the reading list present characters who are dynamic: their lives and identities are changing, they are gaining more awareness about who they are, and they are adapting to new environments and moments in history. Through the literature, we will discuss and write about the themes of change, awareness, adaptation.

  • AP Government and Politics United States

    This course prepares students for the AP Government test. Units covered include the Constitutional Underpinnings; Political Beliefs and Behaviors; Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media; Institutions: Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, Courts; Public Policy; Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Students receive considerable practice with the timed essay.

    Prerequisites: A- or better in US History or AP US History and teacher recommendation.

  • Medieval World History

    Students will learn about the social, cultural, religious, and political changes that occurred across the continents (Africa, South America, Asia, and Europe) from approximately 500 to 1400 CE. Students learn about the history and geography of great civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout the world during medieval times. We will examine the growing economic interaction among societies, as well as the exchange of ideas, customs, and inventions. Students will practice reading for comprehension and learn how to take efficient notes while reading. The exploration of current global issues and the evolution of students’ social consciousness are also discussed.

  • S.T.E.M. Year Three

    Students will continue to work on the project they began in years one and two and submit this project to various national science and technology competitions such as: the Intel Science Competition, Google Science Fair, and other new STEM competitions.

  • S.T.E.M. Year Two

    Biomedical Engineering is the second year of the three year course sequence in the STEM program. In this year-long course students will continue computer programming and working in teams of three on the design project they began in STEM year one.

    This course begins with an overview of biology concepts as they are applied to the field of medicine. Students will also gain important knowledge in anatomy and physiology in this second year. The emphasis of biomedical engineering is on finding solutions by researching, testing, and applying medical, biological, chemical, electrical, and materials information. Students will learn what it means to pursue an undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering and the types of jobs and carreers they may consider in the future. Engineers are employed by hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, medical device and testing companies, government agencies, universities, and medical schools. in order discover new ways to answer the combines the rigors of applied medicine. As in STEM year one, students will need to devote a considerable amount of time and independent learning in this course.

  • S.T.E.M. Year One

    This Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) program is made possible by a grant TVT recieved from theGruss Foundation and the Center for Initiatives in Jewish Education. The first year in this three-year STEM sequence of study is a Foundations of Engineering course. It is designed to be taught in conjunction with (not in replacement of) traditional math and science courses in TVT’s academic curriculum. Students must commit to the full three year course of study in order to be considered for this foundations course. This year long course will provide an overview of the many diverse fields of engineering including (but not limited to) electrical, biomedical, biotechnical and digital electronics. In this first year, students will learn computer programming and the principals of research and design in order to design a solution to a technical problem of their choosing. Students in this project-based learning course will work collaboratively in teams of three, as they collectively discover a question or problem that needs to be answered with an innovative solution/invention. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of their engineering design problems. As this course requires a significant amount of independent learning, students who have demonstrated a strong motivation to learn will be the first to be considered.

  • Jewish Studies 7: Bible - Tanakh: Later Prophets

    Bible - Tanakh: Later Prophets


    This course introduces students to the fascinating chronology of the prophets, not from the popular conception of them as fortune-tellers but from the history of their leadership. The prophets led the Israelites for 600 years, as tribes rose into kingdoms.

    The themes include war and peace, alliances and feuds, and prosperity and poverty. We will build upon the topics and study skills developed in 6th and 7th Grade English, History and Jewish Studies.

    Our story will begin where we left off last year: the end of the United Kingdom of Israel and its subsequent division into two Kingdoms: Judea and Israel .We will learn about leadership styles, dynamic characters, political and economic development in ways that help students advance their abilities in reading comprehension, critical thinking, and written and oral presentation. Honors students will use the textbook for I Kings by Drs. Shahar and Rina Yonay.

    Rabbinics: Teshuvah (repentance), Tefillah (prayer), Tzedakah (justice)
    In this B’nei Mitzvah year, students will investigate the nature of responsibility to themselves and others. Our themes are universal and fundamental – teshuvah (repentance), tefillah (prayer) and tzedakah (justice).

    Students will weigh the balance between tradition and autonomy, discuss how and when community obligations should take priority over personal interests, and explore the complexity of making amends to one another and correcting injustice in the world.

    The study of relevant Rabbinic literature will develop critical thinking skill in our students, who will assess the multiple meanings of sacred texts and discuss their relevance to daily life. Woven into this curriculum will be an introduction to Rabbinic literature and Jewish history from the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE through the editing of the Mishnah in the Third Century.

    The honors course of study will be heavily text-based and students will grapple with the original Hebrew and Aramaic.

  • History 6: Ancient World

    Students in sixth grade study the Ancient Civilizations. The overarching theme is Interactions and Changes. An introductory geography unit addresses topics such as the ways in which people interact with the land, the environment’s influence on human societies, and adaptations to the physical world. Following a geography overview, the course next examines the historical changes that have occurred as societies shifted from nomadic lifestyle to settled agrarian communities, and the specialization of labor that follows. Students will focus on the civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome. Finally, the cumulative unit of study explores comparative philosophies, incorporating elements from the year’s studies. The Ancient Civilizations course also provides opportunities for students to develop skills in the areas of comprehensive reading, critical thinking, evaluating different sources, communicating ideas formally and informally, and writing analytical paragraphs.

  • Modern World History - Honors

    This more intensive course covers the same content as Modern World History but incorporates more depth and concentrates on higher-level skills. Students examine the detailed causes and effects of the turning points that have shaped the modern world. They also develop thinking, speaking and writing skills in connection with their deeper knowledge of history. Students in the honors course are required to participate in scored discussions and to complete numerous written essays, such as an analysis of Machiavelli's The Prince.

    Prerequisites: None.

  • AP European History

    This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement test in European History and also is designed to satisfy intellectual curiosity about an influential and dramatic part of world history. Students study Europe from the Middle Ages to present day. The complexity of readings, deep level of analysis and rigorous pace of the course provide accelerated and motivated students a college-level experience. In addition to the class lectures, discussions and tests, students will be expected to do considerable reading of historical texts and primary source documents and writing of essays both in-class and as homework.

    Prerequisites: A- or better in Modern World History or Modern World History Honors and teacher recommendation.

  • United States History

    United States History is a survey of 20th century America. The first quarter is a general review of United States history from its colonial inception to approximately 1900. The focus is on the origin and development of democratic institutions in America, the nation’s social framework, and cultural evolution. The second quarter begins a more in- depth study of America in the 20th century and will focus on the Progressive movement, American involvement in imperialism, and World War I and its aftermath. The second semester covers the period between the 1920’s and the 1990’s with particular emphasis upon the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, and the Vietnam War. A term paper is required in the second semester.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of Contemporary World History or AP European History.

  • AP English Literature and Composition

    AP English Literature and Composition* (Grade 12)

    AP English is an accelerated, literature-based course, which uses writing as the primary mode of assessment and introduces students to college-level scholarship involving careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Focus includes the historical placement of works as well as features of genre, literacy of Western tradition, rhetorical analysis, and sentence style and correctness. In addition to writing about each major work of literature under study, students will produce essays on poetry, drama, and non-fiction. The texts and assignments, especially concentration on the timed essay, help prepare students for the College Board AP English Literature exam. The texts and level of inquiry are equivalent to a college freshman humanities course. Texts include “Their Eyes were Watching G-d”.

    Prerequisites: Completion of English 11 or English 11 Honors with an A- or better, writing sample, teacher recommendation

  • Kindergarten Library Science

    Kindergarten Library

    An important goal of the Library/Media program is to encourage students to make reading a habit and to promote a lifelong love of literature. After weekly story time in the library, students browse the shelves and check out books. Kindergarteners keep their books in their “cubbies” in the classroom and learn about the importance of taking care of the books. The objective is for the children to have an increased appreciation of literature and a high degree of competence, confidence, and comfort when visiting a library. The library is an integral part of the school program in teaching values through literature. Students are introduced to high quality children’s books (Caldecott Award Books and Sidney Taylor Books). The library also provides opportunities to purchase books through Book Fairs.

    Students will be able to:

    Become acquainted with the kinds of materials in the Library Media Center
    Explain the purpose of a visit to the library
    Demonstrate the proper care of library materials
    Locate a self-selected book in the Library Media Center
    Locate the beginner section of the library
    Ask a question to solve an information problem
    Articulate a simple citation (author and title) to indicate an information source
    Acquire information through observation and listening
    Use picture clues
    Use the title as a clue to content
    Identify characters and setting
    Follow one-step directions

  • S.T.E.M. Elective (Grade 7)

    Tarbut V Torah is offering project based, student centered, elective in partnership with the Center for Initiatives in Jewish Education and the Israel Center for Excellence in Education. This elective, entitled Excellence 2000 (E2K) is based on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) curriculum design.

    Through fun research projects, mind-bending math problems and international competitions, puzzles and challenges, middle school students participating in the E2K program find themselves engaged and ready to take on further math and science opportunities. With E2K classes, students are encouraged to focus on the process of problem-solving rather than the results. During this year-long elective students will have a chance to explore some of the following questions:

    What are the forces causing a rocket to take off into the skies? What speed is required to break free of the earth's force of gravity? Why does hot air rise? Does the tip of a branch of a tree get longer from its tip or its base? What is the egg we eat as an everyday food? What is the meaning of the structure so characteristic of the egg? And where is the chicken in all of this?

    Through experimentation and reasoning students make very interesting discoveries. Students work in groups to solve exciting scientific and creative thought puzzles. This hands-on experience provides a unique opportunity for team-building and cooperative learning.

  • AP Biology* (Grades 10-12)

    AP Biology* (Grades 10-12)

    AP biology is an intensive study of biological principles for students with strong backgrounds in biology and chemistry. It is designed to be the equivalent of a first year college course for Biology majors. Topics covered include, ecology and animal behavior, organic chemistry, cell biology, genetics, biotechnology, metabolism, anatomy and physiology, evolution and the classification of organisms. The eight major themes of biology, science as a process, evolution, energy transfer, continuity and change, structure and function relationship, regulation, interdependence in nature, and science, technology and society are emphasized throughout the course, where they are used to tie concepts together. The course has a rigorous laboratory investigation component which complements the class material. Emphasis is placed on fostering independent learners by developing the following skills: analysis and critical thinking, scientific writing, oral communication and teamwork skills.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Honors Biology with a minimum grade of B+ or completion of CP Biology with a minimum grade of A.

  • Middle School Yoga

    Yoga students will learn postures and core strengthening exercises designed to relax the body and mind. Exercises facilitate the flow of energy in the body and increase flexibility in the muscles, joints and spine. We will practice breathing techniques for relaxation, energy and clarity. We will develop better balance and sensitivity in our bodies by becoming more aware of them through practice and discipline.

  • Upper School Yoga

    Yoga students will learn postures and core strengthening exercises designed to relax the body and mind. Exercises increase flexibility in the muscles, joints and spine. We will practice breathing techniques for relaxation, energy and clarity. We will develop better balance through practice and discipline.

    Prerequisite: None

  • Fifth Grade - Physical Education

    The Lower School Physical Education program encourages students to experience the joy of participating in organized physical activities. The goals of the program mirror that of the entire K-12 program:

    • To provide physical activity essential to optimum growth and development
    • To provide physical activities that will contribute to the student’s knowledge of how to use leisure time wisely
    • To offer a wide range of activities for motor skill development
    • To provide opportunities for mental development through the learning of game rules, techniques and strategies
    • To provide opportunities for individual activities

    The Physical Education curriculum includes a wide variety of activities, including sports, dance, recreation, and physical fitness. All activities taught are aimed to accommodate individual student needs and skill levels. Skills and challenges are presented so students can work individually or in groups, and to think critically.

    Students should be able to vary the manner in which skills are performed and should begin to use skills in combination with each other. Students should exhibit the ability to adapt and adjust movement skills to uncomplicated yet changing environmental conditions and expectations. Mature forms of basic loco motor patterns should be developed. In weight bearing, balance, and dance activities, students should begin to exhibit qualities that demonstrate aesthetic performance.

    Students should begin to develop an awareness of participation in physical activity as a conscious decision and personal choice for both enjoyment and health-related benefits. This knowledge should be reflected in their personal decisions for participation outside of Physical Education class.

    Students will be able to:

    • Identify personal interests and capabilities in regard to his or her own physical activity
    • Select and participate regularly in physical activities for specific purposes (e.g., to improve skill or health or for personal pleasure)
    • Identify opportunities in the school and community for regular participation in physical activity 


    Students should identify the purpose for activity-specific rules, safe practices, procedures, and etiquette, and—with few reminders—they should follow these principles. Each student should continue to develop cooperation skills to bring about the completion of a common goal while working with a partner or in small groups. Students should be able to work independently and productively for short periods of time.

    The students will be able to:

    • Participate in the establishment of rules, procedures, and standards of etiquette that are safe and effective for specific activity situations
    • Work cooperatively and productively in a small group to accomplish a set goal in both cooperative and competitive activities
    • Work independently and utilize time effectively to complete assigned tasks

    Students should discover the joy of playing with friends and learn how positive social interaction can make activities more fun. Students should interact positively with others in the class, regardless of personal differences. Students should be able to recognize the role of physical activity in their understanding of diversity in modern culture. Students should continue to include and support each other and respect the limitations and strengths of individual group members.

    The students will be able to:

    • Recognize the influence of individual differences (e.g., age, disability, gender, race, culture, skill level) on participation in physical activities
    • Recognize the positive attributes that individuals of varying gender, age, disability, race, culture, and skill level bring to physical activity
    • Work cooperatively with peers of differing skill levels

    Students should choose an appropriate level of challenge in activities. They should recognize that physical activity can become an important avenue for self-expression.

    The students will be able to:

    • Recognize physical activity as a positive opportunity for social and group interaction
    • Recognize that participation in physical activity is a source of self-expression and meaning (e.g., aesthetic, challenging, pleasurable, fun, social)
    • Celebrate the successes of others along with personal successes and achievements
  • Fourth Grade - Physical Education

    The Lower School Physical Education program encourages students to experience the joy of participating in organized physical activities. The goals of the program mirror that of the entire K-12 program:

    • To provide physical activity essential to optimum growth and development
    • To provide physical activities that will contribute to the student’s knowledge of how to use leisure time wisely

    • To offer a wide range of activities for motor skill development
    • To provide opportunities for mental development through the learning of game rules, techniques and strategies
    • To provide opportunities for individual activities

    The Physical Education curriculum includes a wide variety of activities, including sports, dance, recreation, and physical fitness. All activities are aimed to accommodate individual student needs and skill levels. Skills and challenges are presented so students can work individually or in groups, and to think critically.

    Students should be able to vary the manner in which skills are performed and should begin to use skills in combination with each other. Students should exhibit the ability to adapt and adjust movement skills to uncomplicated yet changing environmental conditions and expectations. Mature forms of basic loco motor patterns should be developed. In weight bearing, balance, and dance activities, students should begin to exhibit qualities that demonstrate aesthetic performance.

    Students should begin to develop an awareness of participation in physical activity as a conscious decision and personal choice for both enjoyment and health-related benefits. This knowledge should be reflected in their personal decisions for participation outside of physical education class.

    Students will be able to:

    • Identify personal interests and capabilities in regard to his or her own physical activity
    • Select and participate regularly in physical activities for specific purposes (e.g., to improve skill or health or for personal pleasure)
    • Identify opportunities in the school and community for regular participation in physical activity

    Students should identify the purpose for activity-specific rules, safe practices, procedures, and etiquette, and—with few reminders—they should follow these principles. Each student should continue to develop cooperation skills to bring about the completion of a common goal while working with a partner or in small groups. Students should be able to work independently and productively for short periods of time.

    The student will be able to:

    • Participate in the establishment of rules, procedures, and standards of etiquette that are safe and effective for specific activity situations
    • Work cooperatively and productively in a small group to accomplish a set goal in both cooperative and competitive activities
    • Work independently and utilize time effectively to complete assigned tasks

    Students should discover the joy of playing with friends and learn how positive social interaction can make activities more fun. Students should interact positively with others in the class, regardless of personal differences. Students should be able to recognize the role of physical activity in their understanding of diversity in modern culture. Students should continue to include and support each other and respect the limitations and strengths of individual group members.

    The student will be able to:

    • Recognize the influence of individual differences (e.g., age, disability, gender, race, culture, skill level) on participation in physical activities
    • Recognize the positive attributes that individuals of varying gender, age, disability, race, culture, and skill level bring to physical activity
    • Work cooperatively with peers of differing skill levels

    Students should choose an appropriate level of challenge in activities. They should recognize that physical activity can become an important avenue for self-expression.

    The student will be able to:

    • Recognize physical activity as a positive opportunity for social and group interaction
    • Recognize that participation in physical activity is a source of self-expression and meaning (e.g., aesthetic, challenging, pleasurable, fun, social)
    • Celebrate the successes of others along with personal successes and achievements
  • Third Grade Physical Education

    The Lower School Physical Education program encourages students to experience the joy of participation. The goals of the program mirror that of the entire K-5 program, which is to provide:

    • Physical activity essential to optimum growth and development

    • Physical activities that will contribute to the student’s knowledge of how to use leisure time wisely

    • A wide range of activities for motor skill development

    • Opportunities for mental development through the learning of game rules, techniques and strategies 

    • Opportunities for individual activities

    The Physical Education curriculum includes a wide variety of activities, including sports, dance, recreation, and physical fitness. All activities are aimed to accommodate individual student needs and skill levels. Skills and challenges are presented so students can work individually or in groups, and to think critically.

    Students should be able to vary the manner in which skills are performed and should begin to use skills in combination with each other. Students should exhibit the ability to adapt and adjust movement skills to uncomplicated yet changing environmental conditions and expectations. Mature forms of basic loco motor patterns should be developed. In weight bearing, balance, and dance activities, students should begin to exhibit qualities that demonstrate aesthetic performance.

    The student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate mature form in loco motor skills (walk, run, hop, skip, jump, gallop, slide, and leap)
    • Demonstrate smooth transitions between combinations of loco motor movements and combinations of manipulative patterns
    • Sequence weight bearing, rolling, balancing, and traveling activities with control, both with and without equipment
    • Adapt kicking, striking, and throwing patterns to simple, changing environments (e.g., kicking, moving ball, or striking a friendly toss)
    • Throw a hand-sized ball overhand with force (e.g., to hit a wall thirty feet away);
    • Combine loco motor patterns (e.g., sliding, jumping, running, and hopping) in time to music
    • Use movement concepts (body, space, effort, and relationship)—to vary fundamental patterns
  • Second Grade - Physical Education

    • Rules and procedures
    • Cooperative games: playground games
    • How to resolve conflicts: rock, paper, scissors Space awareness: general and personal

    Movement skills

    • Starting/stopping
    • Football
    • Soccer
    • Basketball
    • Hockey
  • First Grade Physical Education

    The Lower School Physical Education program encourages students to experience the joy of participating in organized physical activities. The goals of the program mirror that of the entire K-12 program:

    • To provide physical activity essential to optimum growth and development
    • To provide physical activities that will contribute to the student’s knowledge of how to use leisure time wisely
    • To offer a wide range of activities for motor skill developmentTo provide opportunities for mental development through the learning of game rules, techniques and strategies
    • To provide opportunities for individual activities

    The Physical Education curriculum includes a wide variety of activities, including sports, dance, recreation, and physical fitness. All activities are aimed to accommodate individual student needs and skill levels. Skills and challenges are presented so students can work individually or in groups, and to think critically.

    Students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate most fundamental movement patterns (e.g., throwing, receiving, jumping, and striking) and gain control of varied use of these patterns
    • Demonstrate controlled traveling, rolling, and balancing actions
    • Travel with control forward, backward, and sideways using a variety of loco- motor patterns and change directions quickly
    • Move with awareness of others in general space
    • Kick, throw, catch, and strike objects under simple conditions (e.g., kicking and striking a stationary ball, catching an accurately tossed ball)
    • Work cooperatively with others to achieve a team goal
  • Kindergarten Physical Education

    The Lower School Physical Education program encourages students to experience the joy of participating in organized physical activities. The goals of the program mirror that of the entire K-12 program, which is to provide:

    • Physical activity essential to optimum growth and development
    • Physical activities that will contribute to the student’s knowledge of how to use leisure time wisely
    • A wide range of activities for motor skill development
    • Opportunities for mental development through the learning of game rules, techniques and strategies
    • Opportunities for individual activities 
The Physical Education curriculum includes a wide variety of activities, including sports, dance, recreation, and physical fitness. All activities are aimed to accommodate individual student needs and skill levels. Skills and challenges are presented so students can work individually or in groups, and to think critically.

    Students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate most fundamental movement patterns(e.g., throwing, receiving, jumping, and striking) and gain control of varied use of these patterns
    • Demonstrate controlled traveling, rolling, and balancing actions
    • Travel with control forward, backward, and sideways using a variety of loco- motor patterns and change directions quickly
    • Move with awareness of others in general space
    • Kick, throw, catch, and strike objects under simple conditions (e.g., kicking and striking abstationary ball, catching an accurately tossed ball)
    • Work cooperatively with others to achieve a team goal
  • Middle School PE

    Through a variety of individual, group, and team activities, each student will improve in the areas of cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and the general components of fitness (push-ups, crunches, etc.). Each student will have the opportunity to participate and improve in team and individual sports. Students will engage in activities that will allow them to develop and perfect life-long skills; and each student will have fun, relieve stress, improve his or her self-esteem, self-confidence, and learn to enjoy exercise. There will always be an opportunity for a student to succeed.

  • Middle School Dance

    Dance students will learn, experience, and master skills from the different genres of contemporary dance including: ballet/lyrical, musical theatre, jazz, and hip hop. Students will also be expected to work together in groups in order to create their own choreography. These dance experiences will give students the knowledge necessary to freely use terms and ideas involved in critiquing live dance performances. It will also help them to gain the skill and confidence necessary in order to participate in a live performance. This class may be taken either as a P.E. class or as an elective.

  • Upper School Dance Team

    More experienced dance students will continue to practice, experience, and master skills from the different genres of contemporary dance including: ballet/lyrical, musical theatre, jazz, and hip hop. Students will also be expected to perform at various school and sporting functions. This is an intensive lab class. This class may be taken either as a P.E. class or as an elective.

    Prerequisite: Minimum of 3 years of dance experience.

  • First Grade Hebrew

    Our Hebrew Studies aims to help all students achieve literacy in the Hebrew language by teaching reading skills (decoding with an emphasis on reading comprehension) as well as receptive, expressive (oral) and written expression simultaneously. Our program builds a strong foundation of word recognition and word study skills. The Hebrew program is interactive, encouraging and supportive while constantly promoting student active participation.

    The student will:

    • Develop reading skills based on the phonic approach, emphasizing reading as a process whereby he/she learns to combine newly taught vowels and syllables
    • Learn vocabulary words taught in the context of the following topics: Family members, animals, fruits and vegetables, numbers, clothing, etc.
    • Develop the use of sentence patterns
    • Describe a picture in single word, short sentences and short paragraphs

    Learn the following grammatical concepts:

    • Singular and plural for male and female
    • Demonstrative pronouns
    • The conjunctive vav
    • The definite article
    • Verbs in present tense (male and female forms)
    • The use of prepositions
  • Kindergarten Hebrew

    Our Hebrew Studies aims to help all students achieve literacy in the Hebrew language by teaching reading skills (decoding with an emphasis on reading comprehension) as well as receptive, expressive (oral) and written expression simultaneously. Our program builds a strong foundation of word recognition and word study skills. The Hebrew program is interactive, encouraging and supportive while constantly promoting student active participation.

    The student will able to:

    • Recognize the sounds of all letters in the Hebrew alphabet
    • Associate sounds with Hebrew letters
    • Learn vocabulary words taught in the context of the following topics: Days of the week, seasons, body parts, numbers, colors and colors
    • Use high frequency Hebrew vocabulary to develop a strong foundation for conversation
    • Use simple phrases and sentences that describe their daily routine
    • Follow directions in Hebrew 

  • Second Grade Hebrew

    • All about me
    • Welcome
    • Intro to letters and vowels up to reading short stories: Who, What, Where, When, Why
    • Writing short paragraphs
    • Cursive handwriting